0

Online Color Tool

Posted by admin on November 13, 2012 in Uncategorized |

Color brings a message even if we don’t realize it. While this message can vary by culture it pays to know what colors “say” in your own corner of the universe, and even what color means to your target market.

If you don’t think that color speaks just complete this sentence, “red means……. and green means ……..” . If such simple ideas work for all of a given culture or market what could it mean to the graphic design of your website, brochure, or product if you know some of this information.

First let’s start with the basics.

The color wheel. The color wheel shows the basic colors, each wheel is different in how many shades of each color is shown, but they are essentially the same.

Color harmony, colors that go together well. These will be colors that are next door to each other on the color wheel. Such as blue and green. In reference to clothes these colors match each other. Instinctively most of us know which colors go together when we dress ourselves every morning.

Color complements
, colors that set each other off, they complement each other. These are colors that are opposite on the color wheel. Such as blue and orange.

Color depth, colors can recede or jump forward. Remember that some colors seem to fall back such as blue, black, dark green, and brown. Other colors will seem to step forward such as white, yellow, red, and orange. This is why if you have a bright orange background it may seem to fight with any text or images that you place on it. The orange will always seem to move forward.

In graphic or web design, it’s important to know what colors mean. You can now see why a black back ground with green type would be bad, beyond being nearly impossible to read, if your target market thinks that black represents mourning and green makes them sick. There are exceptions to every rule of course.

So you may want to include some research in what colors mean to your target market. Colors that would get the attention of a teen would probably annoy an older person and the colors that appeal to the older person wouldn’t get a second look from a young person. Color may be one of the most overlooked aspects of design.

Make your own color scheme online with online color scheme tool. The tool works based on modern Color Wheel. Simply set a base color and then the scheme will be automatically created for you. Also the color harmonies.

 

START NOW

0

Everyone Need to Know Just a Little HTML to Get By

Posted by admin on November 13, 2012 in Uncategorized |
Commonly Used HTML Codes
Header tags
HTML Code Sample
<H1>Header 1</H1>

Header 1

<H2>Header 2</H2>

Header 2

<H3>Header 3</H3>

Header 3

<H4>Header 4</H4>

Header 4

<H5>Header 5</H5>
Header 5
<H6>Header 6</H6>
Header 6

 

Text formatting tags
HTML Code Sample
<B>bold</B> bold
<U>underline</U> underline
<I>italic</I> italic

 

Alignment tags
HTML Code Sample
<P ALIGN=Left>your text

your text

<P ALIGN=Center>your text

your text

<P ALIGN=Right>your text

your text

 

Ordered list (numbers)
HTML Code Sample
<OL>
<LI>First row
<LI>Second row
</OL>
  1. First row
  2. Second row

 

Unordered list (bullets)
HTML Code Sample
<UL>
<LI>First row
<LI>Second row
</UL>
  • First row
  • Second row

 

Definition list
HTML Code Sample
<DL>
<DT>Term
<DD>Description
</DL>
Term
Description

 

Horizontal line tag
HTML Code Sample
<HR>
<HR SIZE=6 WIDTH=50%>

 

Break tags

HTML Code

Description
<P> Paragraph break
<BR> Forced line break

 

Indentation tag
HTML Code Sample
Here is some text. <BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE>Here is one line of indented text.<BR>
Here is another line of indented text.
</BLOCKQUOTE>
Here is some text.

Here is one line of indented text.
Here is another line of indented text.

 

External link tags
HTML Code Sample
<A HREF=”filename or URL”>description</A>For example:
<A HREF=”filename or URL”>
CNN</A>
CNN

 

Internal link tag (anchor tag)
HTML Code Sample
<A NAME=”anchor name”>Section name</A>For example:
<A NAME=”anchor name”>Introduction</A>
Introduction

 

Internal link tag (link tag)
HTML Code Sample
<A HREF=”#anchor name”>Destination</A>For example:
<A HREF=”#anchor name”>
Introduction</A>
Introduction

 

Graphic tags
HTML Code Sample
<IMG SRC=”balloon.gif“>
(By default, the graphic is left aligned.)
hot air balloon
<IMG SRC=”balloon.gif” Align=right> hot air balloon
<P ALIGN=Center>
<IMG SRC=”
balloon.gif“>

hot air balloon

<IMG SRC=”balloon.gif” Align=right Vspace=20> hot air balloon
<IMG SRC=”balloon.gif” Align=left Hspace=30> hot air balloon

0

Quick Tutorial on How to Create WordPress Websites

Posted by admin on November 13, 2012 in Uncategorized |

In this quick tutorial I’m going to guide you step-by-step on how to create a similar web page using the WordPress blogging software.

1) Web Hosting

First off all, you need good web hosting for WordPress. I recommend going with a web host that has a cPanel, as it is easy to install WordPress using Fantastico (a function in the cPanel).

Yes, you could also go with free web hosting, but I don’t recommend that, as WordPress requires a database to work and even the best free web hosts have problems with this (this was my own experience with Freehostia.com, I then went for paid hosting).

I recommend using BlueHost web hosting. They have cPanel and you can host unlimited domains on one hosting account. So you can have as many WordPress blogs (websites) on one hosting account as you want for just $6.95 per month.

Or you can also pick one of these top WordPress hosting providers. You will be fine with the cheapest plans (unless you are going to make your website a really big one).

2) Install WordPress

I recommend installing WordPress using the one-click WP installation feature with Fantastico or SimpleScripts in the cPanel. You can check out this tutorial on how to Install WordPress Using SimpleScripts. It’s really easy and quick, easier that you might thought.

3) Upload a WordPress Template

Find a nice WordPress theme for your website and just upload it to the wp-content/themes/ folder. Then activate it in the WP admin panel – in Appearance -> Themes.

For good WordPress themes I recommend you to check out my own themes on my free, premium & custom WordPress Themes site wpmix.com (I’m a WordPress themes designer). I hope you like them.

If you are looking for a custom WordPress theme for your website, check out my website DesignX3M.com on which I offer WordPress web design services.

4) Modify the Theme

If you do not want the comments and the “posted by… on…” displayed to make your website not look like a blog, just delete the following from the index.php (and also delete the same in the files page.php and single.php – if there are these files):

  • <?php the_time(‘F jS, Y’) ?><?php edit_post_link(‘, Edit’); ?>
  • <div class=”comm”><?php comments_popup_link(‘Post Comment’, ‘Comments (1)’, ‘Comments (%)’); ?></div>

Note: Backup the files of your theme before editing it, so that you have the original files in case you do something wrong.

You might also like to edit some images of the theme like e.g. the header image. I have done both of these modifications on the theme of this website – I removed the comments and added the text “wordpress.lexty.com” into the header image.

And that’s it. You are done, good luck with your new Wordpres website!

 

Click here to view original blog post.

0

Four simple ways to develop better customer relationships

Posted by admin on November 8, 2012 in Uncategorized |

Five Tips for Following-up the Right Way

Chances are, there is little doubt in your mind about the importance of follow-up in your marketing…you just need a few tips to get moving in the right direction. Here are a few things to keep in mind as you put your follow-up procedures in place.

1. Follow up immediately.If a prospect expresses interest in your company, don’t let them slip through the cracks. Follow up right away to start building a relationship.
2. Manage the frequency of your follow-up.Frequency is critical. If your follow-up is too sporadic, contacts may forget who you are. If you follow up too often, you risk being viewed as a pest. Avoid the urge to communicate with your prospects too often. Less is definitely more.
3. Manage expectations.In order to avoid unkind thoughts and SPAM complaints, set email expectations up front. Most complaints come when prospects are surprised – so tell subscribers exactly what you will be sending, when, and how it will benefit them.
4. Practice permission-based marketing.Before you email anyone, make sure you have permission to do so. This is as simple as including an “opt-in” button on your webform or other lead capture method. Once you have their permission, they are less likely to send you to the SPAM folder and more likely to respond to your messages.
5. Be persistent.Remember, 80% of your prospects may not be ready to buy right now, but they will be ready within 2 years. Don’t give up on the opportunity to stay in touch with these prospects – through special offers, helpful tips and tricks, coupons, industry news, new product information, etc. You never know when one of these prospects will be ready to buy.

Put these principles to work in your follow-up marketing and you’ll start seeing much better response rates. There’s a gold mine of potential out there.

Original Post By Kirk Master

0

How Much Are Facebook Fans Really Worth?

Posted by admin on November 7, 2012 in Social Media |

As brands and businesses of all kinds invest time and money in  attracting fans for their Facebook pages, a sinking question has begun to set in: Is there any ROI (return on investment) for building up your Facebook presence? Besides stroking the ego of the CEO or head of marketing, how much is a Facebook fan worth to your business?

How should you measure the value of your own Facebook fans?  (Or more precisely: the value of connecting to them on Facebook, in addition to all your other channels.) You need to start with the business model of your own company and understand how Facebook relates to it:

Are you using Facebook to generate new leads who may become customers?

To increase revenue by selling directly within Facebook itself?

To drive product trial with Facebook coupons for use in-store?

Following are five steps, you can then take to determine the value and ROI of your own Facebook fans:

1: Determine your customer valuation. How much are your customers worth, in general? Any business should have at least a rough measure of “customer lifetime value”  – the average value of a customer over time. (A great primer can be found in Sunil Gupta and Donald Lehmann’s book “Managing Customers as Investments.”)

2. Measure change in that value caused by your Facebook page. The next question is, how much more valuable are your customers due to your efforts on Facebook? Increases in customer value are typically driven by acquisition (getting new customers), retention (getting current customers to remain longer), and expansion (getting them to spend more). Which are you changing with Facebook, and by how much?

3. Measure the cost of your Facebook presence. Contrary to popular assumption, social media is not free. Costs associated with a Facebook fan page include: initial development, licensing third party apps (e.g. for selling within your page), Facebook advertising, and staff to create content and interact each day with fans on the page.

4. Calculate your Facebook ROI. To find out the return on your Facebook investment, simply take the increase in your customer value that is attributable to Facebook, divide it by the costs of your efforts, and subtract 1. So, if Facebook drove a $60,000 increase in customer value this year and cost you $40,000, this means your ROI is .50, or a 50% return on your investment. (If your ROI is negative, you need to change your strategy before spending more money).

5. Compare with efficacy of other channels. Facebook is surely not the only platform you are using to engage with customers and drive customer value. Be sure to compare its ROI with your other efforts: email marketing, blogging, Twitter, LinkedIn, and of course, offline marketing as well.

Let’s see how this might work in two very different companies:

SCENARIO A: Mid-Sized Business Services Company

The brand is not well known outside current customers. Every new customer is worth a sizable sum to company. Current customers have already been recruited to Facebook, and the firm is now using paid Facebook ads (pay-per-click) to try to attract more. Trial and error shows that X clicks convert to Y new fans, and Y fans convert to Z customers.  What to Measure: the ROI of acquiring new customers this way vs. other marketing spends. What to Optimize: improve the Facebook landing page (to improve your ratio of fans per ad-click, Y:X), and improve your sales funnel for converting Facebook fans into new customers (the ratio of Z:Y).

SCENARIO B: Large Consumer Packaged Goods Brand

The brand is well known. Large data sets and quantitative modeling have shown a link between customer interactions with the brand and purchase volume (e.g. X more interactions with brand triggers Y more sales to that customer). In this case, Facebook is adding value as an additional channel for interactions with existing customers, to drive more sales. What to Measure: the number of interactions, and which content is creating the most response and impressions. What to Optimize: improve the content to optimize interactions, NOT the raw number of fans. What you need is fans who will interact, and content they will interact with, not new fans who never “like,” share, or notice the content on your page.

Original Article by David Rogers

0

Leave Freestyling to the Rappers and Lyricists

Posted by admin on October 29, 2012 in Small Business Tips |

Whether you are still presenting your products “face-to-face,” or have embraced the benefits of webinars it’s critical to use a selling script.

Every time you approach a prospect or customer, you should be prepared with a powerful and proven marketing script.

Practiced presentation massively outperforms one that’s simply delivered off the cuff. Yes, whether you’re selling face-to-face or online, you need to be flexible and be able to cope with things that crop up, but you should not allow them to divert you from your main flow.

You must remember that your interaction with your prospects is a sales presentation and not a chat around the coffee table with your buddies. The purpose of your webinar, online demo, or meeting is to sell and make you money! And as sales is a process not an event, your process – your sales presentation – should be carefully planned, constructed, practiced, and delivered. Use a sales script because:

  • It makes your message consistent.
  • The results can be measured and the script improved.
  • It systematizes your business.
  • You can make a strong first impression (without blundering for something to say).
  • Prepares you for any prospect objections, questions, etc. without getting you off track.

One word of warning: Many times people who use sales scripts sound robotic and unnatural. You can still read a script and be real. And when you do both you will see an incredible increase in your sales!

Original Post By Clate Mask

0

A Blog is Not the Solution for Everything

Posted by admin on October 25, 2012 in Small Business Tips |

There are some functions a blog simply won’t serve. Here are several marketing functions that can’t be blogged, no matter how hard you try:

  • A direct-response program. While it’s okay to discuss various aspects of your business, as they relate to the topic at hand, beware the slippery slope to overt sales pitches.
  • An alternative to email marketing. In a similar way, resist the urge to use a blog as channel for messages that belong in your email program.
  • A press release. As an official announcement from your company to the media, a press release speaks in the formal, third person voice—and hampers dialogue in the casual atmosphere of a blog.

0

Practical Social Media Tips

Posted by admin on October 23, 2012 in Social Media |

Here are a handful of his tips that illustrate that point:

  • Don’t plagiarize your identity; find what’s unique about you and share it honestly.
  • Work hard to ensure that your branding is consistent online and offline.
  • Express gratitude.
  • Be consistent and committed.
  • Make sure to add value in your communications.
  • Don’t fear negative feedback; instead, embrace it, learn from it, deal with it.
  • Define your social media objectives and align them with your overall goals.

Above all, keep in mind that what users want most is a sense of your brand’s humanity—how you treat employees, whether your character matches your corporate philosophies, and whether there’s pride in the origins and crafting of your product or service. Social media is the perfect medium for expressing that passion—with those who are looking to share it with you.

0

5 Tips for Following-up the Right Way

Posted by admin on October 18, 2012 in Small Business Tips |

Chances are, there is little doubt in your mind about the importance of follow-up in your marketing…you just need a few tips to get moving in the right direction. Here are a few things to keep in mind as you put your follow-up procedures in place.

1. Follow up immediately.

If a prospect expresses interest in your company, don’t let them slip through the cracks. Follow up right away to start building a relationship.

2. Manage the frequency of your follow-up.

Frequency is critical. If your follow-up is too sporadic, contacts may forget who you are. If you follow up too often, you risk being viewed as a pest. Avoid the urge to communicate with your prospects too often. Less is definitely more.

3. Manage expectations.

In order to avoid unkind thoughts and SPAM complaints, set email expectations up front. Most complaints come when prospects are surprised – so tell subscribers exactly what you will be sending, when, and how it will benefit them.

4. Practice permission-based marketing.

Before you email anyone, make sure you have permission to do so. This is as simple as including an “opt-in” button on your webform or other lead capture method. Once you have their permission, they are less likely to send you to the SPAM folder and more likely to respond to your messages.

5. Be persistent.

Remember, 80% of your prospects may not be ready to buy right now, but they will be ready within 2 years. Don’t give up on the opportunity to stay in touch with these prospects – through special offers, helpful tips and tricks, coupons, industry news, new product information, etc. You never know when one of these prospects will be ready to buy.

Put these principles to work in your follow-up marketing and you’ll start seeing much better response rates. There’s a gold mine of potential out there.

Original Post By Kirk Master

0

Accelerating Fundraising through Social Media

Posted by admin on October 16, 2012 in Uncategorized |

There hasn’t been much cause for celebration at many nonprofits lately. The public has been distracted by the faltering economy, volunteers have been hard to find, and donor databases have dried up.

One bright spot is using social media as a low cost fundraising tool. Organizations that are testing social media strategies are realizing how much potential these tools have. Fundraisers can click the mouse a few times and connect with people passionate about their cause, helping them spread the word, volunteer, and donate.
In the first five days after the Haiti earthquake struck in January 2010, the top Facebook Cause for Haiti earthquake relief – benefiting Oxfam America – raised over $100,000, signaling a significant shift in fundraising through social media .

The Best Fundraising Punch
For now, the social media tool that delivers the greatest fundraising punch is Facebook Causes, which empowers people to mobilize their social networks to benefit U.S. registered 501(c)(3) nonprofits .  Every single Facebook user has the tools to create a Cause for an issue or campaign, recruit others to join, keep everybody informed with updates, and raise money.
Facebook Causes processes donations automatically via credit card, tallies the results, and reports donation activity via a public “scorecard.” The Causes platform works because it’s deeply embedded in the world’s leading social networks (there’s an application for MySpace, too), and it can:
• Create community, and spread awareness.
• Connect people and ideas in new ways.
• Attract new donors and raise money for specific projects and programs.
How to Get Started
How does it work?  First, your organization becomes a Causes partner. You receive a profile and access to a dashboard, where you can track donations and download donor contact information. When you’re ready to start your own Cause, you can use the Facebook Causes application. Since Causes is a third‑party application, you can have Causes, a Fan Page, and a Group on Facebook, if you so desire.

Keys to Success
How do you make the Facebook Causes application really sing?
Choose an attention-grabbing title. Think of it as a headline. You want to captivate potential supporters.
Convey a sense of urgency so people know you need their help now.
Make your case in three points or less. As with other fundraising communication, the case needs to be simple and to the point.
Provide a concise description of where the Cause is currently, where the Cause is going, and what your goals are. Remember to include relevant links.
• Use an evocative photograph that inspires people to take action.
Recruit, recruit, recruit. Use the recruiting tools associated with the Facebook Causes application to invite the maximum number of potential supporters every day, which is 60. But don’t stop there – take your recruiting outside the Facebook borders to newsletters and e‑mail, too.
Facebook Causes is a great way to connect with and mobilize believers in your cause. Successful nonprofits of the coming decade will find ways to aggressively leverage this and other social media tools.

Source: Accelerating Fundraising through Social Media By Ed Schipul as Published in Nonprofit World May 2010

Copyright © 2009-2017 Gabby's Blog All rights reserved.
This site is using the Desk Mess Mirrored theme, v2.5, from BuyNowShop.com.